What does the 'top' command do in Linux?

Issuing time: 2022-11-22

The 'top' command is a Linux command that displays a list of processes running on the system. The output can be sorted by CPU, memory usage, or any other column.The 'top' command can also be used to kill processes, view process information, and more.For more information about the 'top' command, please visit the following website:

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How do I show the full command line for a process using 'top'?

To show the full command line for a process using 'top', type:

top

This will display a list of all running processes on your system, with their associated command lines. You can use this information to identify which process is causing a problem or to see how your system is performing overall. For example, if you want to know which program is consuming most of your CPU time, you can use top to investigate.

Why is the full command line important when using 'top'?

The full command line is important when using 'top' because it allows you to see all of the processes running on your computer. This can be helpful if you want to know which process is causing a problem or if you just want to get a general overview of how your computer is performing.

How can I end a process using 'top'?

To end a process using 'top', type: top -u

For example, to end the process with ID 7576, you would type: top -u 7576.

What other features does 'top' have?

top is a command line tool that displays information about the status of your computer. It includes features to monitor processes, memory usage, file systems, and network connections. top also has options to display performance data for individual applications or all running processes on the system.

How do I update the information displayed in 'top'?

top is a command line tool that displays the status of your computer's processes and memory. To update the information displayed in top, use the -u option.

What processes are taking up the most CPU time?

The top command can be used to display a list of processes that are using the most CPU time. This list will include processes that are currently running on the system, as well as processes that have been recently started. The top command can also be used to display a list of all processes on the system, regardless of their CPU usage.

To view the process ID (PID) for a specific process, you can use the pid command. For example, to find out which process is using the most CPU time on your system, you could type:

top -n 1 | grep PID_of_process_you_want

You can also use the ps command to view information about individual processes.

What processes are taking up the most memory?

To find out what processes are taking up the most memory, you can use the top command. To run the top command, type:

top

This will display a list of all the running processes and how much memory they are using. The process with the largest amount of memory used will be at the top of the list. You can then use this information to figure out which processes are taking up too much memory and should be reduced or eliminated.

Are any processes swap-heavy?

The top command can be used to show the processes that are using the most memory. In this case, it would show which processes are swapping out data to disk. If a process is swapping out data to disk a lot, it may be because it is using up too much memory and needs to swap out data to disk in order to continue running.

Are there any runnable processes waiting for scheduling?

There are many runnable processes waiting for scheduling. To see a list of all the processes currently waiting for scheduling, use the top command:

top -H | grep "waiting"

This will return a list of all the processes that are currently waiting for some kind of action. The output may look something like this:

0 10 3128 ? S 0:00 /usr/bin/php7-fpm -C /etc/php7/fpm/pool.d 1 10 3128 ? S 0:00 /usr/bin/php7-fpm -C /etc/php7/fpm2.d 2 10 3128 ? S 0:00 ps aux|grep php 7 root 1708 1 0 00 : 01 : 09 pts / 0 00 : 00 [email protected] 19 3610 ? R+ 20 : 11 pts / 4 00 : 02 [email protected] 21 3610 pts / 4 00 : 02 [email protected] 22 3610 pts / 5 00 : 01 www-data 23 9240 ? R+ 24 : 13 pts / 6 04 : 43 php 7 25 8248 pts 26 12288 ? R+ 27 14336 ? W 28 15360 ? W 29 16384 ?? I 30 16768 ?? I 31 16992 ?? I 32 18720 ?? I 33 19840 ?? I 34 20736 ?? I 35 21952 ??? Ss 36 22976 ??? Ss 37 23928 ??? Rs 38 24960 ??? Rs 39 25120 ??? Rs 40 25544 ??? Rs 41 25768 ??????? (S) 42 25912 ??????? (S) 43 26368 ??????? (S) 44 26432 ??????? (S) 45 26624 ??????? (S) 46 26848 ??????? (S) 47 27072 __libc_start_main () from ../.libs/_startup 48 27616 _start () 49 27720 main () 50 27824 exit -- Verbose mode enabled 51 27928 rtld_init() 52 28064 getuid() 53 28160 geteuid() 54 28224 openlog("httpd", O_RDONLY|O_CLOEXEC) 55 28632 setenv("PATH", "/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/) 56 28880 execve("httpd", ["httpd"], [/*], []); 57 29024 closelog(); 58 29152 stat ("configurationfile") 59 29280 chdir("..") 60 29344 lstat ("configurationfile") 61 29568 stat ("./var/#{LOGNAME}") 62 29872 fstat ("./var/#{LOGNAME}") 63 30096 unlink("./var/#{LOGNAME}") 64 30112 rm("./.gitmodules"); 65 30272 mkdir("./.gitmodules"); 66 30416 touch("./.gitmodules"); 67 30560 chmod("./.gitmodules", 0775); 68 30736 git init 69 30848 git add . 70 30976 git commit -m "initial commit" 71 31184 git push origin master 72 31392 cd .. 73 31488 rm -rf ./tmp 74 31592 echo "Completed in #{time}" >&5 75 31696 sleep 5 76 31704 Completed in 05 seconds 77 31840 show running process list 78 31956 ps axu | grep http 79 32064 Top

The output from the top command shows that there are five processes waiting for scheduling. The first two entries show that PHP7 is running as a daemon and is polling its pool files for requests. The third entry shows that the root user is currently logged in and working on their computer. The fourth and fifth entries show that www-data and php7 are respectively pushing changes to their repository and committing them to disk.

short-term vs long-term performance goals with 'top'.?

top is a command line tool that can be used to show long-term and short-term performance goals for systems. The top command shows information about the CPU, memory, disk I/O, and network usage on a system. It can also be used to determine which processes are using the most resources.

The top command can be used to determine which processes are using the most resources on a system. By default, it will show information about the CPU, memory, disk I/O, and network usage on a system. You can use the -t option to specify which type of resource you want to see information about. For example, you can use the -t option to show information about process usage. This will show you which processes are using the most resources on your system.

The top command can also be used to determine which files or directories are using the most space on your system. You can use the -h option to specify how much data (in bytes) you want to see in each column in the output of top . This will help you find out which files or directories are taking up too much space on your system.